The Arc of Amador and Calaveras Counties

Administrative Offices
209-267-5978

Amador Campus
209-267-5978
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Calaveras Campus
209-754-4001
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Supported Living
Services
209-217-8341
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Supported Employment
209-217-8145
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REMOTE LEARNING

Week Thirty- One:

 

Calendar

What are You Doing Every Day/Week? Record it on this Calendar. If you can’t print the calendar call Kim or Ericka and we’ll send you a few copies, or create a similar calendar on a piece of paper.

 

 

Sheltering-in-Place

Check out this Shelter-in-Place packet, it has GREAT information and interactive exercises!

 

Amador Day Program ZOOM Meetings:

  • Mondays at 10:00am for Math!
  • Mondays at 11:00am for Relationships!
  • Mondays at 1:00pm for Art!
  • Mondays at 2:00pm for Spanish!
  • Tuesdays at 10:00am for Brain Games!
  • Tuesdays at 11:00am for History!
  • Tuesdays at 1:00pm for Google Earth!
  • Tuesdays at 2:00pm for Cooking!
  • Wednesdays at 10:00am for Zoology!
  • Wednesdays at 11:00am for Individual Living!
  • Wednesdays at 1:00pm for Cultural Art!
  • Wednesdays at 2:00pm for Exercise / Yoga!
  • Wednesdays at 3:00pm for Rec!
  • Thursdays at 10:00am for Book Club!
  • Thursdays at 11:00am for Health!
  • Thursdays at 1:00pm for Music!
  • Thursdays at 2:00pm for Science!
  • Fridays at 10:00am for Current Events!
  • Fridays at 11:00am for Time!
  • Fridays at 1:00pm for 3 R's!
  • Fridays at 2:00pm for Fun and Games!
  • stay tuned for more to come!

Calaveras Day Program ZOOM Meetings:

  • Mondays at 8:00am for Spanish!
  • Mondays at 1:15pm for Fitness!
  • Tuesdays at 8:00am for Fitness!
  • Tuesdays at 9:30am for Creative Writing!
  • Tuesdays at 10:30sm for Sign Language!
  • Tuesdays at 1:15pm for Spanish!
  • Wednesdays at 8:00am for Brain Games!
  • Wednesdays at 10:30am for Social Hour!
  • Wednesdays at 11:45am for Virtual Tours!
  • Wednesdays at 1:15pm for Open Future Learning!
  • Thursdays at 10:00am for Music!
  • Thursdays at 2:00pm for Trivia!
  • Fridays at 10:00am for Art Demo!
  • Fridays at 11:00am for Reading Literacy!
  • Fridays at 1:00pm for Newsletter!
  • Saturdays at 1:00pm for Social Hour!
  • Stay tuned for more to come!

 

Visit the Self-Isolated Penguins – How are their communities different? How are they the same? How are they entertaining themselves? Can we learn anything from them?

https://www.calacademy.org/learn-explore/animal-webcams/live-penguin-cams

https://www.georgiaaquarium.org/webcam/african-penguin-cam/

https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/animals/live-cams/penguin-cam

 

 

Money

Week 31 Counting Money Worksheet: Click Here

 

Budget for the Week: (Interactive and Ongoing Throughout Facility Closure). Let’s say you can go to WalMart every weekend to get things you need. This week we’ll give you $57. What would you buy with it? Record your transactions on this Check Book Register. If you can’t print the register call Kim or Ericka at the phone numbers below and we’ll send you a few copies, or create a similar register on a piece of paper.  So far you've received:

  • $100
  • $55
  • $75
  • $40
  • $60
  • $25
  • $90
  • $30
  • $85
  • $10
  • $80
  • $65
  • $45
  • $50
  • $35
  • $70
  • $55
  • $95
  • $20
  • $25
  • $15
  • $45
  • $22
  • $13
  • $47
  • $73
  • $22
  • $68
  • $81
  • $74
  • $57

 

Sports & Fitness

Exercise of the Week: Standing Side Leg Raises

What to do:

  • Stand with your feet together and your hands on your hips.
  • Keeping your figure nice and straight, lift one leg up to the side.
  • Bring your leg back in to starting position.
  • Repeat with other leg.
  • See how many you can do!

 

 

Friday Night Dance Party 8pm – 9pm: https://www.facebook.com/events/808640122957828/?active_tab=about

 

Chair Yoga: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=chair+yoga+youtube&qpvt=chair+yoga+youtube&view=detail&mid=7A38100F5BD573EC5B577A38100F5BD573EC5B57&&FORM=VRDGAR&ru=%2Fvideos%2Fsearch%3Fq%3Dchair%2Byoga%2Byoutube%26qpvt%3Dchair%2Byoga%2Byoutube%26FORM%3DVDRE

 

 

Sport Movie of the Week:

The Express: The Ernie Davis Story

Ernie Davis is a young African American growing up in Pennsylvania with his uncle Will Davis Jr., in the late 1940s. Davis lives with his extended family, including his grandfather, Willie 'Pops' Davis, who guides and educates him. Davis' mother, Marie Davis, eventually returns to their residence to inform the family that she has remarried and can now afford to raise Ernie at her own home in Elmira, New York. Upon relocating to Elmira, Davis enrolls in a Small Fry Football League and excels on the field as a running back.

Several years later, Syracuse University football head coach Ben Schwartzwalder searches for a running back to address the absence of Jim Brown, the graduating player completing his All-American senior season. Schwartzwalder is impressed with Davis after viewing footage of him playing for Elmira Free Academy and took his team to a state championship. Schwartzwalder convinces Brown to accompany him on a recruiting visit to see Davis and his family in hopes of luring him to commit to Syracuse. After their visit, Davis decides to enroll at Syracuse and spurns the recruiting efforts of other colleges.

At the start of the 1959 college football season, Davis immediately excels playing for the varsity team, to lead Syracuse to victories over several college football teams. After Syracuse defeats UCLA to conclude the regular season undefeated, the team decides by choice to play the 2nd ranked Texas Longhorns in the Cotton Bowl Classic. During the game on January 1, 1960, Davis boldly attempts to lead his team to victory but is hampered by an injured leg and biased officiating. Towards the end of the game, Davis scores a crucial touchdown to preserve a Syracuse lead. The matchup concludes with a victory for Syracuse, and its first national championship.

Read more about The Express: The Ernie Davis Story here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Express:_The_Ernie_Davis_Story

Watch The Express: The Ernie Davis Story on Hulu, Amazon or on DVD…

 

 

Health

Recipe of the Week: Cauliflower Grilled Cheese

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fruit/Vegetable Smoothie of the Week: Frothy-Chilly Smoothies

  • 2 cups of frozen strawberries

  • 2 cups of frozen peaches

  • 2 cups of low-fat yogurt

  • 2 cups of milk

Blend together for a delicious, healthy drink!

 

 

 

Self-Care BINGO: A new BINGO card will come out each week - how fast can you get a BINGO?  Three days? Two maybe?

 

 

 

 

 

Independent Living

 

 

 

 

Employment Skills

 

 

 

 

Travel / Around the World

Tokyo, Japan:

Tokyo was originally a small fishing village named Edo, in what was formerly part of the old Musashi Province. Edo was first fortified by the Edo clan, in the late twelfth century. In 1457, Ōta Dōkan built Edo Castle. In 1590, Tokugawa Ieyasu was transferred from Mikawa Province (his lifelong base) to Kantō region. When he became shōgun in 1603, Edo became the center of his ruling. During the subsequent Edo period, Edo grew into one of the largest cities in the world with a population topping one million by the 18th century. But Edo was Tokugawa's home and was not capital of Japan. (That was caused by the Meiji Restoration in 1868.) The Emperor himself lived in Kyoto from 794 to 1868 as capital of Japan. During the Edo era, the city enjoyed a prolonged period of peace known as the Pax Tokugawa, and in the presence of such peace, Edo adopted a stringent policy of seclusion, which helped to perpetuate the lack of any serious military threat to the city. The absence of war-inflicted devastation allowed Edo to devote the majority of its resources to rebuilding in the wake of the consistent fires, earthquakes, and other devastating natural disasters that plagued the city. However, this prolonged period of seclusion came to an end with the arrival of American Commodore Matthew C. Perry in 1853. Commodore Perry forced the opening of the ports of Shimoda and Hakodate, leading to an increase in the demand for new foreign goods and subsequently a severe rise in inflation. Social unrest mounted in the wake of these higher prices and culminated in widespread rebellions and demonstrations, especially in the form of the "smashing" of rice establishments. Meanwhile, supporters of the Meiji Emperor leveraged the disruption that these widespread rebellious demonstrations were causing to further consolidate power by overthrowing the last Tokugawa shōgun, Yoshinobu, in 1867. After 265 years, the Pax Tokugawa came to an end.

To learn more about Tokyo visit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tokyo

 

 

Reading/Writing Skills

Week 31 Word Search: Click Here

 

Let’s Write a Poem 

Rules for Writing Good Poetry - More Practice

Last week we shared come rules about writing good poetry, some of you really liked that so we'll repeat the rules and write another poem! Here are the guidelines for those looking to take their poetry writing to the next level:

  1. Read a lot of poetry. If you want to write poetry, start by reading poetry. You can do this in a casual way by letting the words of your favorite poems wash over you without necessarily digging for deeper meaning.
  2. Listen to live poetry recitations. By listening to the sounds of good poetry, you discover the beauty of its construction—the mix of stressed syllables and unstressed syllables, alliteration and assonance, a well placed internal rhyme, clever line breaks, and more.
  3. Start small. A short poem like a haiku or a simple rhyming poem might be more attainable than diving into a narrative epic. A simple rhyming poem can be a non-intimidating entryway to poetry writing.
  4. Don’t obsess over your first line. If you don’t feel you have exactly the right words to open your poem, don’t give up there. Keep writing and come back to the first line when you’re ready.
  5. Embrace tools. Use a thesaurus or a rhyming dictionary to help you complete a poem, You’d be surprised how many professional writers also make use of these tools. Just be sure you understand the true meaning of the words you insert into your poem.
  6. Enhance the poetic form with literary devices. Develop your poetry writing skills by inserting metaphor, allegory, synecdoche, metonymy, imagery, and other literary devices into your poems.
  7. Try telling a story with your poem. Many of the ideas you might express in a novel, a short story, or an essay can come out in a poem.
  8. Express big ideas. Because good poetry is about precision of language, you can express a whole philosophy in very few words if you choose them carefully. Even seemingly light poetic forms like nursery rhymes or a silly rhyming limerick can communicate big, bold ideas. You just have to choose the right words.
  9. Paint with words. When a poet paints with words, they use word choice to figuratively “paint” concrete images in a reader’s mind.

This week, try writing a poem about traveling the worldPlease share your poem with your advocate.

 

 

 

Art

Week 31 Mandala: Click Here

 

Art classes, projects and more with AMADOR ARTS at: https://www.amadorarts.org/art-from-home/

 

Art Project Jack O' Lantern Origami:

 

 

 

Scavenger Hunt: Each week we’ll have you find an item, keep all items in a “safe place”, such as a small box, for use at the end of the day program facility closure. We’ll use these items to make an art project.   This week, find a leaf. In your “safe place” you should have:

  • A push pin (thumb tack)
  • 12 inch piece of string
  • 12 inch by 12 inch piece of cardboard
  • A straw
  • A rubber band
  • A tooth pick
  • A small paint brush
  • A black Sharpie
  • A shiny penny
  • A can of corn
  • An envelope (letter Size)
  • Blue paint
  • Scotch tape
  • A Popsicle stick
  • An Empty soda can
  • A Spoon
  • A Pine Cone
  • Something Soft
  • A paperclip
  • Something green
  • Duct Tape
  • A Sea Shell
  • A Beaded Necklace
  • A Book
  • A Flower
  • A Feather
  • A Button
  • A Penny
  • Large rock
  • Bottle Cap
  • A Leaf

 

Art / Museum Tour: Tokyo Fuji Art Museum  - https://artsandculture.google.com/partner/tokyo-fuji-art-museum

 

Interested in Acting?  Check out this great website that has TONS of pointers and lessons: https://www.theatrefolk.com/free-resources

 

 

Gaming and Other Technology

Featured Computer/Cell Phone/Tablet Game of the Week: Ridiculous Fishing

Ridiculous Fishing is a mobile fishing video game where players use motion and touch controls to catch fish and subsequently shoot them out of the sky for cash. The player fishes in pursuit of fame as a fisherman named Billy. The game mechanics consist of three minigames: casting the fishing line, catching fish, and shooting the fish in the air. The player casts the line and tilts the device to avoid the fish as the hook sinks. Upon hooking a fish, the hook ascends and the player tilts the device to catch as many fish as possible en route to the surface. Above water, the fish are launched into the air, and the player taps the screen to shoot the fish out of the sky to earn money before they fall into the water. The fish differ in characteristics including swim pattern and the number of shots required. Shooting jellyfish detracts from the total income. There are four stages, each with its own visual and audio theme and rare fish, and an endless mode where players can work towards the highest score. Earnings can be spent in a store towards persistent upgrades such as longer fishing line length, invulnerable drills, frivolous hats, bigger guns, chainsaw lures, a hair dryer and toaster (to zap inadvertent catches), fuel for the chainsaw, and a necktie for greater income. There is also a Fish-o-pedia in Billy's smartphone that gives gameplay hints and tracks stats such as fish caught, which is the progress for unlocking new levels. There are no in-app purchases.

 

Card Game of the Week – Hearts

These are the rules I use for Hearts. There are many variations possible, but I use the basic ones from Wikipedia.

  1. The objective of Hearts is to get as few points as possible. Each heart gives one penalty point. There is also one special card, the Queen of spades, which gives 13 penalty points.
  2. When the game starts you select 3 cards to pass to one of your opponents. Typically you want to pass your three worst cards to get rid of them. Which opponent you pass to varies, you start by passing to the opponent on your left, then in the next game you pass to the opponent on your right, third game you pass across the table and in the fourth game there is no card passing.
  3. Each turn starts with one player playing a single card, also called leading. The suit of that card determines the suit of the trick. The other players then play one card each. If they have a card in the same suit as the first card then they must play that. If they don't then they can play one of their other cards. Once four cards have been played, the player who played the highest ranking card in the original suit takes the trick, i.e. he takes the four cards on the table and he then starts the next turn. Any penalty cards in the trick (hearts or queen of spades) are added to the players penalty score. So you want to avoid taking any tricks that have hearts or the queen of spades.
  4. The player who has the two of clubs at the start of the game leads in the first hand, and he MUST lead with the two of clubs.
  5. You cannot lead a trick with hearts, until hearts has been broken (played on another suit). So if it is your turn to lead and no heart has been played yet then you may not select a heart as the card to play first. In some variations of the game you can't play the queen of spades until hearts has been broken as well, but in this version you can always play the queen of spades and she doesn't break hearts.
  6. In the very first round you may never play a heart or the queen of spades, not even if you don't have any card in the suit of the lead card.
  7. Once all cards have been played the penalty points are counted and the player with the fewest points wins that hand. When one or more players reach 100 points or more then the entire game is finished, and the player with the least points win. If points are over 100 and there are two or more equal with the least points then play continues until there's only one winner.
  8. Shooting the Moon! Generally it's bad to get penalty cards, but there is one extra twist! If you get ALL the penalty cards (13 hearts + Queen of spades) then you get 0 points and the other 3 players get 26 points each! This is called Shooting the Moon. Trying this can be a really risky move though, since if another player gets just one of the hearts you'll end up with a lot of points...

 

Play Hearts on-line at: https://cardgames.io/hearts/

 

Online Gaming: https://www.minecraft.net/en-us/article/free-educational-content-minecraft-marketplace-?fbclid=IwAR3rPkGK6ccD9cTgQlMN9-5bX1pwzb1Y2cfUvCm9JAAnHlZsnKlzGU-G83I

 

App of the Week: Ridiculous Fishing -

For Android:https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.funplaygames.ridiculousfishmaster&hl=en_US&gl=US

For Apple: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/ridiculous-fishing-a-tale-of-redemption/id601831815

 

 

 

Nature and Weird Science

 

Tanuki:

The Japanese raccoon dog, also known as the tanuki, is a subspecies of the Asian raccoon dog.

Researchers have suggested that they be considered a separate species, N. viverrinus, or that raccoon dogs of Japan could be further divisible into separate subspecies as N. p. procyonoides (hondo-tanukiホンドタヌキ本土狸) and N. p. albus (ezo-tanukiエゾタヌキ蝦夷狸), but both views are controversial.

As the tanuki, the animal has been significant in Japanese folklore since ancient times. The legendary tanuki is reputed to be mischievous and jolly, a master of disguise and shapeshifting, but somewhat gullible and absent-minded. It is also a common theme in Japanese art, especially statuary.

Tanuki is often mistakenly translated into English as "badger" or "raccoon" (as used in the US version of the movie Pom Poko and outlined in Tom Robbins' book Villa Incognito), two unrelated types of animals with superficially similar appearances. Traditionally, different areas of Japan had different names for raccoon dogs as animals, which would be used to denote different animals in other parts of the country, including badgers and wild cats; however, the official word in the standard Tokyo dialect is now tanuki, a term that also carries the folkloric significance.

The North American raccoon (Procyon lotor) is translated as araiguma (アライグマ, 洗熊) in Japanese, while badger is translated as anaguma (穴熊lit. hole bear) or as mujina (, ).

The Japanese raccoon dog is mainly nocturnal, but they are known to be active during daylight. They vocalize by growling or with groans that have pitches resembling those of domesticated cats. Like cats, the Japanese raccoon dog arches its back when it is trying to intimidate other animals; however, they assume a defensive posture similar to that of other canids, lowering their bodies and showing their bellies to submit.

Usually social groups are limited to a breeding pair, but individual Japanese raccoon dogs may stay in a group of non-paired individuals until they find a mate.

The species is predominantly monogamous. The breeding period for the species is synchronized between females and males and lasts between February and April. A litter (typically with 4–6 pups) is born after a gestation period of 9 weeks. The parents look after their pups at a den for around a month, and then for another month after the pups leave the den.

Japanese raccoon dogs live for 7–8 years in the wild, and have reached the age of 13 in captivity.

To learn more about the Tanuki visit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_raccoon_dog

 

 

Music

Genre of the Week: J-Pop -

 

The origin of modern J-pop is said to be Japanese-language rock music inspired by the likes of The Beatles. Unlike the Japanese music genre called kayōkyoku, J-pop uses a special kind of pronunciation, which is similar to that of English. One notable singer to do so is Keisuke Kuwata, who pronounced the Japanese word karada ("body") as kyerada. Additionally, unlike Western music, the major second (sol and la) was usually not used in Japanese music, except art music, before rock music became popular in Japan. When the Group Sounds genre, which was inspired by Western rock, became popular, Japanese pop music adopted the major second, which was used in the final sounds of The Beatles' song "I Want to Hold Your Hand" and The Rolling Stones' song "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction". Although Japanese pop music changed from music based on Japanese pentatonic scale and distortional tetrachord to the more occidental music over time, music that drew from the traditional Japanese singing style remained popular (such as that of Ringo Shiina).

At first, the term J-pop was used only for Western-style musicians in Japan, such as Pizzicato Five and Flipper's Guitar, just after Japanese radio station J-Wave was established On the other hand, Mitsuhiro Hidaka of AAA from Avex Trax said that J-pop was originally derived from the Eurobeat genre. However, the term became a blanket term, covering other music genres—such as the majority of Japanese rock music of the 1990s.

In 1990, the Japanese subsidiary of Tower Records defined J-pop as all Japanese music belonging to the Recording Industry Association of Japan except Japanese independent music (which they term "J-indie"); their stores began to use additional classifications, such as J-club, J-punk, J-hip-hop, J-reggae, J-anime, and Visual kei by 2008, after independent musicians started to release works via major labels. Ito Music City, a Japanese record store, adopted expanded classifications including Group Sounds, idol of the 1970s–1980s, enka, folk and established musicians of the 1970s–1980s, in addition to the main J-pop genres.

Whereas rock musicians in Japan usually hate the term "pop", Taro Kato, a member of pop punk band Beat Crusaders, pointed out that the encoded pop music, like pop art, was catchier than "J-pop" and he also said that J-pop was the pops (ポップスpoppusu) music, memorable for its frequency of airplay, in an interview when the band completed their first full-length studio album under a major label, P.O.A.: Pop on Arrival, in 2005. Because the band did not want to perform J-pop music, their album featured the 1980s Pop of MTV. According to his fellow band member Toru Hidaka, the 1990s music that influenced him (such as Nirvana, Hi-Standard, and Flipper's Guitar) was not listened to by fans of other music in Japan at that time.

 

 

Read more Japanese Pop at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J-pop

Listen to Japanese Pop on Pandora, Amazon or YouTube!

 

Movies (for Recreation-Type Activities)

Frankenweenie: 

Young scientist Victor Frankenstein lives with his parents and his beloved Bull Terrier dog, Sparky, in the quiet town of New Holland. Victor's intelligence is recognized by his classmates at school, including his somber next-door neighbor, Elsa Van Helsing, the mischievous Edgar "E" Gore, the obese and gullible Bob, the overconfident Toshiaki, the creepy Nassor, and an eccentric girl nicknamed "Weird Girl". Despite their admiration of him, he communicates little with them due to his relationship with his dog. Concerned with his son's isolation, Victor's father encourages him to take up baseball and make achievements outside of science. Victor hits a home run at his first game; Sparky, seeing Victor's hit, runs away from the bleachers to pursue the ball, to which he is struck and killed by a car, leaving Victor saddened.

Inspired by his new science teacher Mr. Rzykruski's demonstration of the effect of electricity on dead frogs, Victor digs up Sparky's corpse, brings him to his makeshift laboratory in the attic, and successfully reanimates him with lightning. Seeing Weird Girl's cat, Mr. Whiskers, the undead Sparky escapes from the attic and explores the neighborhood. He is recognized by Edgar, who blackmails Victor into teaching him how to raise the dead. Together, the two reanimate a dead goldfish which turns invisible due to an error with the experiment. Edgar brags about the undead fish to his classmates, but when he tries to show it to a skeptical Nassor, it is gone, leading him to speculate that they can only last for a short time. In fear of losing the upcoming science fair, Toshiaki and Bob make a rocket out of soda bottles, which causes Bob to break his arm. Mr. Rzykruski is blamed for the accident and fired. The Gym Teacher replaces him; before Mr. Rzykruski leaves town, he advises Victor to use science wisely.

When Edgar is confronted by Toshiaki, Nassor and Bob on the baseball field at school, he accidentally reveals Victor's actions, inspiring them to try reanimation themselves. Victor's parents discover Sparky in the attic and are frightened, causing the dog to flee. While Victor and his parents search for Sparky, the classmates invade the lab, discovering Victor's reanimation formula. The classmates separately perform their experiments, which go awry and turn the dead animals into monsters: Mr. Whiskers holds a dead bat while it is electrocuted, resulting in him becoming a monstrous bat/cat hybrid; Edgar turns a dead rat he found in the garbage into a wererat; Nassor revives his mummified hamster, Colossus; Toshiaki's turtle, Shelley, is covered in Miracle Gro and turns into a kaiju-like monster; and Bob's Sea-Monkeys grow into amphibious humanoids. The monsters break loose into the town fair, where they wreak havoc.

 

Read more about Frankenweenie at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankenweenie_(2012_film)

Watch Frankenweenie on Amazon, Disney Plus or DVD…

 

 

 

Lending Library

DVDs are checked out on a first-come, first-serve basis. Many of the DVD's are listed below.  If you are interested, talk to your advocate!

 

EDUCATIONAL

Travel

Rick Steve’s Europe (4 Disk) Germany, Swiss alps and Travel Skills, Easter Europe, Italy

Rick Steve’s Europe (4 Disk) Great Britain, Ireland, Spain and Portugal, France and Benelux

Rick Steve’s PBS 11 Shows 2013-2014 (2 disk)

Colorado’s Scenic Train Ride

Kiwi Country New Zealand

Must See Places of the World: Australia the Beautiful

Alaska’s Inside Passage x 2

America By Rail, rout of the Southwest Chief

All Aboard the Potomac Eagle A Scenic Train Ride

Point Lobos, Timeless Coast

The States, Volume 2

Travel the World by Train

Rick Steves’ Scandinavia ( 2 disk)

Rick Steves’ Germany, Benelux, and More (2 disk)

Reader’s Digest Must See Places-Wildlife Treasures

Reader’s Digest Must See Places-Scenic Cruises of the World

Reader’s Digest Must See Places-Australia the Beautiful

 

Animals and Nature

Cry of The Penguin

Deadly Down Under

Metamorphosis

Wolves at Our Door

Species Hunter

Must See Places of the World: Wildlife Treasures

White Shark, Outside the Cage

Planet-Ocean (5 disk)

Explore The Wildlife Kingdom, Lions

Tropical Rainforest

Explore The Wildlife Kingdom, the hidden world of Africa

Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom

Swamp Tigers

Living with Tigers

The Best of nature (6 disk)

Discovery Queen of the Elephants

Disney African Cats

Explore The Wildlife Kingdom, Cougars

Flight the Genius of Birds

March of the Penguins

JAWS of the Pacific

 

History

Nefertiti

The Last Frontier

The Wildest Dream, conquest of Everest

Forbidden City, The Great Within

The Legend of Bigfoot

Flying Scotsman, the World’s Most Famous Locomotive

U.S. Navy Carriers

MythBusters Big Blasts collections (2 disk)

Thunderbirds, Skies of Thunder

Dinosaur Planet

Carrier, fortress At Sea

Ken Burns National Parks (6 disk)

Reader’s Digest Must See Places-Marvels of Mankind

Reader’s Digest Must See Places-Mysteries of the Ancient World

 

Informational and Independent Living

My Life, My Choice Person Directed Living

Temple Grandon

Possibilities, Disabilities and the Arts

It’s So Much Work to Be Your Friend

Managing Threatening Confrontations

Oops, Wrong Planet (Understanding Asperger’s syndrome)

Normal People Scare Me; A Film About AUTISM

How To Make a Good Decision At Home

How To Make A Good Decision In The Community

How To Make A Good Decision In the Workplace or Day Program

Overcoming Obstacles to Learning

How to Improve thinking Strategies for People With Developmental Disabilities (2 disk)

Understanding Developmental Disabilities (2 disk)

I have Tourette’s But Tourette’s Doesn’t Have Me

Leadership Through Personal Change, Ways to Have The Life You Want (2 disk)

The Ethics of Touch, Establishing and Maintaining Appropriate Boundaries

Positive Behavioral Supports, Meeting Unmet Needs

 

HEALTH

Wii Just Dance Disney Party

Wii Just Dance 2018

Wii Dance Summer Party

Wii Just Dance 4

Wii Just Dance 2014

Wii Just Dance 2

Wii Just Dance 2015

Wii Just Dance 2020

Eat Right For A Long And Healthy Life

Richard Simmons Party Off The Pounds

Wii Zumba

Richard Simmons Dancin’ To The Oldies

Walking Down Your Blood Sugar, controlling Diabete